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Extraordinary Is…

filed in Brand Strategy

In a digital world, extraordinary is

Human.
Presence.
Care taken.
Handcrafted.
Eye contact.
Face-to-face.
Heart-to-heart.
The intangibles.
Genuine interest.
A timely response.
That feeling of belonging.
Thanking someone in person.
Executing on the small details.
A handwritten note inside the package.
Choosing the best ingredients even if they cost more.
Treating people the way you would want to be treated.
Extraordinary is hardly ever the extravagant gesture—it’s the ordinary thing, remembered.

Image by Brandon Warren

Not Just Anyone

filed in Brand Strategy, Marketing

Most often, the goal of our marketing is to be found. That goal dictates our marketing strategy.
If you’re trying to be found, you’ll seek out opportunities to interrupt everyone, anywhere.
But there is an alternative.

What would it take for you to be the brand people intentionally chose?
How could you become the one the right people seek out?

Being craved and coveted by that someone, right there, trumps being stumbled on by just anyone.

Image by Anastos Kol

The Sure Thing

filed in Brand Strategy, Success

Before we create a product, design a service or build a business we want to be certain the idea will fly. We want to know for sure that if we build it, people will come.

If we only did the things we were certain would work, we’d never create anything original.

Originality is a leap of faith and success is unpredictable.
Certainty comes with the benefit of hindsight.
Bestsellers are always a surprise.

The best we can do is have the courage to begin before we’re certain.
Taking a risk is less risky than doing nothing at all.

Image by Roberto Trombetta

The Downside Of The Comparative Advantage

filed in Brand Strategy, Marketing

A new cafe opens in Melbourne every other week. Our city is full to bursting with every kind of cafe you could wish for—from holes-in-the-wall doling out espresso to morning commuters, to leisurely brunch places in the suburbs where friends linger and city lunch spots where business deals are done. So how does a new cafe establish itself and get a foothold in the market?

The owners of the little cafe that’s just opened opposite a busy tram stop have decided to come out from behind the counter. They’re spending time during their opening week getting to know the locals and engaging with people waiting for the tram every morning. They’re paying attention to the prospective customer’s story so they can understand how they might fit into that story.

For years conventional marketing wisdom taught us to find customers for our product—to build it and then make them come. Many marketers still start there, by trying to differentiate with features and benefits. They work on having and sustaining a comparative advantage, by aiming to be closer or faster, cheaper or rarer. The thing is the businesses that thrive don’t set out to make a comparable product or service. They aim to be in a category of one—to be the product or service that fits into the customer’s life.

A thriving cafe doesn’t sell coffee by the cup—it sells the ritual for a lifetime.

Image by Margaretes

All Figured Out

filed in Brand Strategy

It’s doubtful that when Amazon founder, Jeff Bezos, now the world’s wealthiest man, launched the company over twenty years ago he had every tactical move figured out. The Bezos of 1999 couldn’t have predicted how his company would come to dominate and diversify. While he may not have understood the exact next step on the journey, Bezos did have a mission and a set of guiding principles upon which he would build and lead his company.

In his 2018 annual letter to shareholders Bezos reiterated the importance of Amazon’s approach.

“This year marks the 20th anniversary of our first shareholder letter, and our core values and approach remain unchanged. We continue to aspire to be Earth’s most customer-centric company, and we recognize this to be no small or easy challenge. We know there is much we can do better, and we find tremendous energy in the many challenges and opportunities that lie ahead.”

Even if you don’t aspire to build the next Amazon, there’s a lot to be learned from their philosophy. A compass is more useful than a map when you’re navigating new terrain. You need to know why you want to go someplace before you can work out exactly how to get there.

Image by Freshwater

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